What Keeps Goggle Innovative

By: Marissa Meyer, Google's Top Manager

 

Google's Nive Notions of Innovation Best Practices Innovation e-Coach Google's 9 Notions of Innovation (full version at 1000ventures.com) Creativity Management Quotes Value Innovation Quotes Dream Power Quotes Idea Management Quotes Google's 10 Golden Rules Google's Guiding Principles Google's Nine Notions of Innovation (by Marissa Mayer)

 

Ideas come from everywhere.
We have this great internal list where people post new ideas and everyone can go on and see them. It's like a voting pool where you can say how good or bad you think an idea is. Those comments lead to new ideas.

Share whatever you can.
People are blown away by the information you can get on MOMA, our intranet. Because there is so much information shared across the company, employees have insight into what's happening with the business and what's important.

You're brilliant, we're hiring.
That's how we're going to stay innovative. We're going to continue to attract entrepreneurs who say, 'I found an idea, and I can go to Google and have a demo in a month and be launched in six.

A license to pursue dreams.
Since around 2000, we let engineers spend 20% of their time working on whatever they want, and we trust that they'll build interesting things.

Innovation, not instant perfection.
The Googly thing is to launch it early on Google Labs and then iterate, learning what the market wants and making it great.' The beauty of experimenting in this way is that you never get too far from what the market wants. The market pulls you back.

Focus on data, not politics.
Run a 1% test [on 1% of the audience] and whichever design does best against the user-happiness metrics over a two-week period is the one we launch. We have a very academic environment where we're looking at data all the time.

Creativity loves restraint.
Engineers love to think their way out of that little box: 'We know you said it was impossible, but we're going to do this, this, and that to get us there.

Worry about usage and users, not money.
If we focus on the users, the money will come. In a truly virtual business, if you're successful, you'll be working at something that's so necessary people will pay for it. Or you'll have so many users that advertisers will pay to sponsor the site.

Don't kill projects. Morph them.
Any project that is good enough to make it to Labs probably has a kernel of something interesting in there somewhere, even if the market doesn't respond to it. It's our job to take the product and morph it into something that the market needs.

More about Google's Nine Notions of Innovation
 

 

 

 

Innovation at Google

Presentation by Google CIO Douglas Merrill

 

 

   

Top 6 Barriers To Innovation Success

Strategies of Market Leaders

Value Innovation

Customer-driven Innovation

Fast Company